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Respected play authorities pen 'Words On Play' to raise awareness on value of play

Albert Einstein once said, “play is the highest form of research.”

It seems the great physicist/philosopher was correct. Research shows that the simple act of playing offers numerous benefits for children, families and communities alike. Children are at their highest level of development when they are playing; making play an essential part of their growth and overall happiness.

Knowing how critical play is for healthy physical, social, emotional and intellectual development, PlayCore, whose mission is to advance play through research, programs and partnerships, is promoting the value of play through the Words On Play Guidebook.

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Does your playground meet the 7 Principles of Inclusive Playground Design?

“Beyond disability, there are abilities; beyond accessibility, there is inclusion.” - Keith Christensen, Faculty Fellow at the Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University

Studies show that youth with physical disabilities have a 4.5 times higher rate of physical inactivity compared to their peers. This statistic, combined with the U.S. Department of Education’s findings that 85 out of 1,000 children between the ages of 3 and 21 are living with one of the following disabilities: Physical, sensory, multiple disabilities, chronic health impairment, social/emotional, communication, cognitive; goes to show the importance of providing inclusive play.

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How active play (and playgrounds) help children become physically literate 

When it comes to children learning the basics, reading, writing and arithmetic have always been the staple foundational skills to teach. But with increasing childhood obesity rates as a result of rising inactivity among today’s youth, many Canadian parents and educators are jumping aboard the physical literacy movement.

A person who is physically literate is defined by PHE Canada (Physical & Health Education Canada) as an individual who moves with competence and confidence in a wide variety of physical activities in multiple environments that benefit the healthy development of the whole person.

InclusivePlayFunding

PlayCore’s overview of potential funding sources is designed for communities that are planning, revitalizing, and/or building inclusive playground projects. By incorporating PlayCore’s seven principles of inclusive playground design, you can create universally designed play environments that increase “playability” for people of diverse abilities, ages, races, genders, ethnicities, cultures, and socioeconomic levels. In addition, including inclusive play principles into your planning can increase your eligibility for grants and other forms of funding.

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The 7 Principles Of Inclusive Playground

Developed in partnership with Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities, PlayCore offers a comprehensive design program for creating play environments for people of all ages and abilities and creating inclusive communities through play. The program defines 7 principles of inclusive playground design that strive to create a truly inclusive and embracing play experience to meet the developmental needs of the whole child by intentionally providing opportunities for physical, cognitive, communicative, social/emotional, and sensory development. 

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